Saturday, July 11, 2009

anat phutthamat: khon rak hai



singer: อาณัติ พุทธมาศ (anat phutthamat)
album: คนรักหาย (khon rak hai)
tracklist:
01. คนรักหาย (khon rak hai)
02. ความหวังครั้งสุดทาย (khwam wang khrang sut thai)
03. เกมส์ความรัก (''games'' khwam rak)
04. สารรักสีฟ้า (san rak si fa)
05. อย่าให้ถึงสาบาน (ya hai thueng saban)
06. ส่วนขาดของหัวใจ (suan khat khong hua chai)
07. ฉันยังมีสิทธิ์บ้างไหม (chan yang mi sit bang mai)
08. รักแท้คือเธอ (rak thae khue thoe)
09. นิลวดี (ninlawadi)
10. คนใจง่าย (khon chai ngai)
11. จุดหมายที่ไม่มี (chut mai thi mai mi)
12. จุดยืนความรัก (chut yuen khwam rak)
13. ปิดฉากรัก (pitchak rak)
14. กำแพงประเพณี (kamphaeng prapheni)
15. วอนประเพณี (won prapheni)
sung by รุ่งฤดี แพ่งผ่องใส (rungridi phaengphongsai)
16. ปวดใจเหลือเกิน (puat chai luea koen)
17. แสบทรวงเหลือดี (saep suang luea di)
sung by อัมพร ประสมศิลป์ (amphon prasomsin)
18. ความรักคืออะไร (khwam rak khue arai)

this week, a tape i don't know much about.. the style is luk krung, and the singer is anat phuttamat. i can't find a great deal of information about him online, only references to his famously low vocal range & pathos-infused delivery, and to his skills as a songwriter, for which he is also (maybe primarily?) known. the two female guests, rungridi & amphon i know are both affiliated with the suntaraphon band, so there's a fair chance our guy was, too. i also think that, like our singer last week, anat may be from the south.. at least, that seems to be where this album was produced. anyhow, it contains some nice, slow love songs; tasteful brass and tearful crooning. enjoy!

10 comments:

peter said...

version ภาษาไทย

erik said...

how deep is your voice ;-)

Dajuin said...

Hi, Thanks for the great post! I have a question -- this song --
12. จุดยืนความรัก (chut yuen khwam rak) -- do you know if it is an original Thai composition? It is extremely popular in Hong Kong and Taiwan in the 1970s and all sources say it is a "Thai folksong", but i cannot find any other proof of this claim except in this version you posted. Are there other versions available on the net?

THANKS !!

peter said...

hey dajuin!
that is very interesting! i don't really know the answer.. all i can say is that this singer was known for writing his own songs (as well as for others), so there's a good chance that this may be the original! i don't recognize the tune from anywhere else.. do you know the artist or song title in chinese?

Dajuin said...

Hi, Peter,

the Chinese original is a soundtrack of the same title:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xT5Vi4JDWM

there are over a dozen other chinese version. I'm writing a short article all the editions.

you might be interested in the Cambodian verions:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22Mo3WgtfgE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEEFiZzttlY

It's such fun detective work :p

Dajuin said...

Peter,

I forgot to say, the Chinese title is "Xiang si he pan" (On the bank of the River of Remembrance).

What does the Thai version title mean?

peter said...

hmm yeah.. it seems like if your sources credit it as a "thai folksong", they might be referring to this.. this is the only version of the song that i know, but it doesn't seem to have been to big of a hit in thailand.. and it's clearly not really a folksong, heh! i wonder whether the cambodian versions took the chinese or thai as their inspiration? very interesting indeed.. i will keep my eyes out for any more information about this, thanks for sharing!
oh, and the title means something like "standpoint of love"

hopeyearn said...

Can you please share the 12th song? I want to listen and see how similar this song and "Xiang si he pan". Thank you.

hopeyearn said...

I am sorry. I find the link and download the songs.

I am sure the 12th song is originated from Thailand. "Xiang Si He Pan" is not an original Chinese song, but a Siam folk song. Though it is uncertain that if Khon Rak Hai wrote this song himself, but, anyway, thank you very much for the Thai version of "Xiang Si He Pan".

Dajuin said...

Peter,

Yes, i agree, it's definitely not a "folk" song. it's certain that the song originated from either Cambodia or Thailand. A Cambodian source said the lyrics of the Cambodian version is pretty much the same as the Chinese lyrics. Given the fact that the Cambodian musicians in the 70s recorded large amount of covers of Mandarin songs from Taiwan and Hong Kong, the route of migration of the song is probably: Thailand > Hong Kong/Taiwan > Cambodia.

To complicate the matter further is the fact that most Hong Kong singers today credit this song to a certain "Virginia Pereira", who can hardly be linked to Thai...